Donate to the Mid-South LGBTQ+ Archive

If you’re interested in contributing to making this project happen, donate to the MomentUM project today! The project funding ends December 4, 2019.

On October 31, 1969, Memphis hosted an event that would forever change the LGBTQ community in our city. Against the backdrop of the Guild Theatre, Bill Kendall organized a revolutionary revel where men dressed as women, women dressed in costume, and everyone gathered to celebrate the art of pageantry and camp. The result was the first public drag show and pageant that Memphis had ever seen: The Miss Memphis Review.

In the 1960s, Memphis city ordinances criminalized same sex dancing, cross dressing, and acts of “vulgar character.” So Kendall strategically chose Halloween, the one night a year where a celebration of gender bending wouldn’t run afoul of these laws. When the crowds arrived at the theatre, they were dressed in costumes as well as formal finery. It was clear that this was going to be a historic event.

Fifty years later, Memphis remembers this event. The Guild and Miss Memphis will be the subject of a historical marker at the Evergreen Theatre on Halloween 2019, the first of its kind in the city. What remains of that late night in 1969 are a few photographs, oral histories that have not yet been captured, and reels of film in critical need of preservation. The Mid-South LGBTQ+ Archive seeks funds to digitize and archivally preserve the audiovisual material from that historic Halloween night. This footage stands to tell the story of what has been called “Memphis’ Stonewall” by community historian, Vincent Astor.

To date, this footage is the oldest of its kind in Memphis and The Mid-South LGBTQ+ Archive wants to make it the cornerstone of how Pride began in the Mid-South. We want our community’s trust to tell the story of all LGBTQ+ persons that call the Mid-South home. Contributions for this project will go to preserve and digitize this and similar film footage and to continue to grow the archive to include a spectrum of narratives that make up the LGBTQ+ community.

Digital Exhibit: Enslaved People in the Southeast

Read the news announcement, and visit the digital exhibit.

From the digital exhibit’s website:

The Association of Southeastern Research Libraries (ASERL) announces a new digital exhibit created and curated by the ASERL Special Collections Interest Group. This collaborative online exhibit recognizes the 400th anniversary of the arrival of the first Africans sold into bondage in the English Colonies. This date, in 1619, is regarded as the beginning of the Trans-Atlantic slave trade in North America.

The exhibit documents the history of the enslaved in the Southeast and includes material related to the many varied aspects of enslavement, including paper documents and records as well as images. These provide valuable information about the entire infrastructure and system of enslavement as well as the individual and group experiences of enslaved people. Items submitted include photos, letters, bills of sale, emancipation documents, insurance and taxation documents, and maps indicating segregation zones. The exhibit will also explore the legacies of slavery by including documents and images related to convict lease labor and Jim Crow in the 20th century.

Designed to illustrate the social complexity as well as the economic and human impact of the American ‘peculiar institution,’ in all its ugliness, these materials can guide the researchers in accurately depicting the institution of slavery in the Southeastern United States. The goal is to learn from our past and make our resources available to students, researchers, other institutions, and the public.”

The University of Memphis’ University Libraries Special Collections selected and provided materials contributing to this digital exhibit.

 

NEDtalks 11/13 & 11/14

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NEDtalks is a bi-annual research forum hosted by the Ned McWherter Library where UofM professors and students share recent research in engaging & entertaining 15-minute presentations in the TEDtalks style. One event of the year is dedicated to UofM professors. The second event, NEDxStudents, is dedicated to UofM students. The Libraries partners with Helen Hardin Honors College for NEDxStudents, and a panel of judges awards the best student presentation of each day a monetary prize.

This year’s faculty NEDtalks will take place Wednesday, November 13, 2019, 3:30 to 5 p.m., & Thursday, November 14, 2019, 2:45 to 4:00 p.m. in the 2nd Floor Common Area in McWherter Library. This is a public event; all are welcome!

Wednesday, November 13, 2019

3:30 – Refreshments & Introduction

3:45 – Dr. Cassandra Nuñez, Department of Biological Sciences, Management-induced social and physiological changes may interact to shape the gut microbiome in feral horses (Equus caballus)

4:00 – Joel Roberts, University Libraries, The Irving Berlin of Memphis: The Early Years of Bob Miller

4:15 – Dr. Cody T. Havard, Kemmons Wilson School of Hospitality & Resort Management, Sports Rivalry Man: Superheroes and Comics to Teach Group Behavior

4:30 – Dr. Deranda Lester, Department of Psychology, Oxytocin – More than a Love Hormone

4:45 – Dr. Jeremy Orosz, School of Music, Stylistic and Linguistic Borrowings Between Hip Hop and Country Music

Thursday, November 14, 2019

2:45 – Refreshments & Introduction

3:00 – Dr. William Dean Clement, Department of English, Drawing Out Leviathan: Biblical Monsters in English Poetry

3:15 – Dr. Brad Dixon, Department of History, “made Horse [of us] to carrie”: Native American Porters in the Early South

3:30 – Dr. Ruoxu Wang, Department of Journalism and Strategic Media, User experience (UX) matters: What are the most desired skills in the UX designer and UX researcher job ads?

3:45 – Dr. Donal Harris, Department of English, Seeing and Reading Civil Rights: Literatures of the Freedom Struggle

Visit our website for more information and for past NEDtalks events.

Discover an Accurate and Trustworthy Search Experience with Google Tools 

Internet information is ubiquitous. It can be overwhelming even to seasoned information professionals. We constantly question if the information provided is any good. Gale eBooks on GVRL can be your go-to research resource.

To flourish in today’s knowledge economy, people need “the capacity and disposition to learn in small, quick doses rather than wade through mounds of links and piles of data.”¹ Because GVRL is built with research in mind, it’s chock-full of features to enrich eBook searching and reading experiences. All eBook content is expertly indexed at the title, chapter, and article level, so users can zoom directly to the information they need. Continue reading

Business Plans Handbook

Just one of the awesome resources within the Gale Virtual Reference Library is the Business Plans Handbook. Published in 2015, this handbook provides business plans actually used by retail, service, and manufacturing industries’ entrepreneurs who need funding for their small businesses. Plans include services like bartending services, mobile hair salon, and web development businesses.

Each entry has industry and market analyses, examples of services offered, personnel needed, operations, growth strategy, marketing and sales plans, and financial analysis. 

If you’re interested in starting your own business, the Business Plans Handbook can give you valuable insight into all of the information you’ll need to get your business off the ground!

Check out all of the great reference resources (dictionaries, encyclopedias, handbooks) that Gale Virtual Reference Library has to offer!

October Events @ McWherter Library

QuickSearch Tips & Tricks

The Libraries’ QuickSearch allows you to search a ton of library databases all at once (though, unfortunately, it can’t search all of them, so don’t give up if you can’t find what you’re looking for on QuickSearch!). QuickSearch is more robust than Google Scholar, and it shows you materials you can access as a UofM student/employee! We created a “Find and Download Full Text Articles in UofM Libraries QuickSearch” video (7 min.) to help guide you through the process, too.

Here are a few tips and tricks to make the most out of your QuickSearch experience: Continue reading

Database Spotlight: Gale Virtual Reference Library/Gale eBooks

When starting off with a research project, where’s the first place (after class notes and lecture) you turn to for more information? I think most of us would answer “Wikipedia.” (Librarians use Wikipedia, too!) However, most instructors discourage citing Wikipedia. Luckily, you have access to many online scholarly reference collections that can be cited as background information for your project! Continue reading

September Events @ McWherter Library

We have some great events at McWherter Library for you in September! Visit our calendar for more details and to register for events!