Universal Design for Learning (UDL)

View the following resources to learn more about the Universal Design for Learning framework and how UDL can assist you in making your courses more inclusive and accessible to a diverse population of learners.

The most consistent finding to emerge from the interdisciplinary study of learning is that when it comes to learning, natural variability is the rule, not the exception. What is perhaps most important to understand about learner variability is not that it exists, but that not all of it is random. Because some variability is systematic, you can design for it in advance. This approach is called Universal Design for Learning (UDL). UDL is an educational framework that guides the design of learning goals, materials, methods, and assessments as well as the policies surrounding these curricular elements with a diversity of learners in mind.  —udloncampus.cast.org

Ignite Presentation

 




 UDL on Campus – Guide

UDL Publications and Controlled Studies

Davies, P., Schelly, C., & Spooner, C. (2013). Measuring the effectiveness of universal design for learning intervention in postsecondary education. Journal of Postsecondary Education and Disability, 26(3), 5-33. (Link to publication)

Smith, F. (2012). Analyzing a college course that adheres to the universal design for learning framework. Journal of the Scholarship for Teaching and Learning, 12(3), 31-61 (Link to publication)

Tristan, U., Moon, N., Todd, R., & Bozzorg, A. (2011). Faculty efficacy in creating productive learning environments: universal design and the lens of students with disabilities. International Journal of Process Education, 3(1), 52-63. (Link to publication)

Gawronski, M. (2013). Measuring the effectiveness of universal design for learning intervention in postsecondary education. Journal of Postsecondary Education and Disability, 26(3). (Link to publication)

Davies, P., Schelly, C., & Spooner, C. (2011). Student perceptions of faculty implementation of universal design for learning. Journal of Postsecondary Education and Disability, 24(1), 19-35. (Link to publication)

Langley-Turnbaugh, S., Blair, M., & Whitney, J. (2013). Increasing accessibility of college stem courses through faculty development in universal design for learning. Universal design in higher education: Promising practices. Seattle: DO-IT, University of Washington. (Link to publication)

Higbee, J. L. (2008). The faculty perspective: Implementation of universal design in a first year classroom. Journal of Postsecondary Education and Disability, 21(2), 60-72. (Link to publication)

Gawronski, M. (2014). Universal design for learning: perceptions of faculty and students at a northeastern community college (Doctoral dissertation). Retrieved from ProQuest. (3672028) (Link to publication)

LaRocco, D., & Wilken, D. (2013). Universal Design for Learning: University Faculty Stages of Concerns and Levels of Use A Faculty Action-Research Project. Current Issues In Education, 16(1), 1-14. (Link to publication)

To share additional resources or findings on Universal Design for Learning in face-to-face, hybrid, or online courses, please contact us at um3d@memphis.edu.

 

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