Constitution Day: September 17th

Written by Benjamin Clanton and Meghan Campbell, Government Publications:

On September 17, 1787, delegates to the aptly named Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia signed the U.S. Constitution, setting in place the structure of our nation’s government that is still followed today. We here in Government Publications regularly handle documents that relate to what was adopted on that day over two hundred years ago. One of the wonderful things about the Constitution is that avenues were put in place to make additions and changes to its original form. With that in mind, we have written about a couple of Constitutional Amendments that both intrigue us and have personal meaning to us as individuals. Enjoy and have a wonderful Constitution Day!

Join us on the 2nd Floor Commons Area in McWherter Library today from 12 – 3 pm, where you can pick up a U.S. Constitution and snacks, and watch a documentary titled The Words that Built America.

Thirteenth Amendment: Abolishing Slavery

Though an elegant document, and one that is still considered world-changing over two centuries after its creation, the U.S. Constitution was not perfect.  Perhaps nothing displays this better than the need for the Thirteenth Amendment, which finally abolished slavery in this country. As someone with a background in history, this amendment stands out to me for a number of reasons. Most importantly, it addressed what many scholars have termed as the ‘original sin’ of the Founding Founders, who struggled morally about how to handle slavery. The men who created and signed the Constitution largely punted on the matter, cementing the institution’s legal standing in the newly created nation through such decisions as the infamous Three-Fifths Compromise, which counted three-fifths of a state’s slaves as population when determining seats in the House of Representatives.

Following the devastation of the American Civil War and Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation, the Thirteenth Amendment not only created the legal framework to end the vile institution of slavery, but also eliminated what it termed ‘involuntary servitude.’ This protected African Americans in the post-Civil War South from being locked into a new form of slavery through unfair labor practices and other restrictions by white landowners and lawmakers in their home states, and has since been seen as a protection for workers against becoming unfairly locked into a system of constant exploitation. The Thirteenth Amendment, along with the other ‘Reconstruction Amendments,’ indeed attempted to create a new era in our society.

However, the fight for equality that these efforts strived for was far from complete. The next century would be marked by struggle. Jim Crow laws in the South created a segregated society marked by ‘equal but separate’ spaces and constant efforts to disenfranchise African American voters. The eventual (and overdue) successes of the Civil Rights movement in the second half of the twentieth century finally saw a turning of the tide against systemic racial discrimination. The ramifications of this amendment are still felt today, as it serves as a harsh but necessary reminder of the dark history of slavery and racism in our nation and as protection to us as American citizens against immoral and unjust servitude. (Written by Benjamin Clanton.)

Nineteenth Amendment: Extending the Right to Vote

Almost one hundred years ago, after a decades-long crusade, women across the United States were granted the long deserved right to vote. The First Women’s Rights Convention (also known as the Seneca Falls Convention) occurred in 1848, and allowed the women’s suffrage movement to gain more traction. It laid the groundwork for the proposal of an amendment that supported a woman’s right to vote to the U.S. Constitution. From there the Nineteenth Amendment was first presented to Congress in 1878, and eventually passed on June 4, 1919. Finally the amendment was ratified on August 18, 1920.

Ratification was in part thanks to the state of Tennessee, which became the final state to vote in favor of the amendment. In fact, young Harry T. Burn, a member of the Tennessee General Assembly was the man who swayed the vote to ensure the Nineteenth Amendment’s ratification. Although, all of the credit cannot exclusively be given to Mr. Burn; his mother was a vital player in his decision to approve of the amendment. Initially, Burn was against the suffrage movement and his intent was to vote “no”. What finally changed his opinion was a letter from his mother, Febb Burn, in which she encouraged her son to “…be a good boy” and vote for the amendment. With this victory, women across the nation earned the freedom and right to vote. Despite the fact the amendment specified that the enforcement of the right to vote would not be discriminated upon the basis of sex, women who belonged to minority groups were not granted the same privilege. It was not until the passage of the Voting Rights Act of 1965 that women in minority groups were eligible to vote in the same capacity as their white counterparts.

If one were to take a look at the United States today, it seems almost impossible that a woman’s right to vote was only made legitimate just shy of a hundred years ago. Though the Nineteenth Amendment has become a very recent reality in the eyes of history, its effects are significant and endlessly important. It has provided generations of women an opportunity to decide the kind of representation that they want on a local and national scale. Its influence cannot be understated, and has provided pathways and opportunities for women who have changed our country and our nation’s government.

From becoming elected officials to having the ability to serve in and for the White House, the Nineteenth Amendment has allowed women to not only gain the privilege to vote, but to eventually be able to become the enactors of change within our political system. A woman’s right to vote can and has altered political discourse in this country; and has proven that everyone has a voice that needs to be heard, seen, and represented. This is inherently what the Constitution has aimed to provide to the citizens of the U.S. in the first place: a nation that can continuously work toward being a fair, balanced, and prosperous place for all its people. (Written by Meghan Campbell.)

The Constitution Today: A Living Document

It is possible that some would see the U.S. Constitution as a dusty old document written and signed by people (all white men, all long dead) over two hundred years ago, one with language set in stone that contains unbendable rules on how the country should operate. However, many others see it as a living, ever changing organism that fuels debate on how our society will function going forward. For example, there are ongoing debates about the original articles which lay the framework of our government: How much power does the President REALLY have? Is Congress truly representative of our citizenry all these years later? Should Supreme Court justices still be allowed lifetime appointments? Oh, and is that pesky Electoral College antiquated or still necessary?

There are also ongoing discussions on matters covered in the Bill of Rights and other Constitutional Amendments that we see in the news every day: gun control, immigration and its relationship to American citizenship, freedom of the press, voting rights, the list truly goes on and on. Based on people’s personal experiences and political allegiances, it often seems that interpretations of these documents are countless and often hotly contested. Thus, as our society grows and changes, we will likely see a continuing debate over how our Constitution and its Amendments apply to it in modern day and, ultimately, the future. (Written by Benjamin Clanton.)

Learn More

Here are some online resources if you want to further your knowledge on the Constitution:

National Archives Digital Reproduction of the Constitution

U.S. Constitution Annotated App (Apple App Store)

Ben’s Guide to the U.S. Government

Our Documents (via NARA)

ConstitutionFacts.com Quiz

Federalist Papers

Articles of Confederation

Lambuth Library News from The University of Memphis Lambuth

Written by Lisa Reilly, Lambuth Campus Librarian: 

What’s New 

graphic with a tiger and informational wordartAdditions of graphics and art have recently spruced up the Lambuth Library. The junction of two walls provided the foundation for a three-dimensional UofM tiger that greets patrons as they enter the libraryour stairwell now hosts art from the “What I Kept” and “Four Freedoms” exhibits recently highlighted on campus; and new signage directs students to our extensive collection of books and quiet study areas. 

Not only does the library look different, but we’ve been making some program updates. Last Spring, we began offering extended hours and it was so popular that we continued this Fall. The Lambuth Library is now open late on Monday through Thursday and is open on Sunday afternoons. And now, just like their main campus peers, Lambuth students may now schedule an appointment with the campus librarian for 30- or 60-minute research consultation sessions. Of course, we welcome research questions anytime we are open, but sometimes it helps to have scheduled time to sit down and discuss research challenges with a librarian! 

Upcoming Lambuth Library Events: 

September 25 from 3:30-4:30: Stress Less Workshop – Don’t let life stress you out! Attend this workshop to get tips from our Academic Support Services Counselor on managing stress. 

September 30 – October 4 (anytime during library hours): Maker Monthly Paper Pretties – Weave strips of magazine pages into functional art. Don’t have much time? Stop by to get started and take what you need to finish it later.

Resource Highlight of the Month 

Check out a robot from the library? Absolutely! The Lambuth Library has Sphero BOLTs available for checkout. These amazing little electronic balls are programmable with pieces of easy-to-use code- make them zig, zag, light up, make sounds, the possibilities are endless. Check one out, get the free app for your device and try your hand at programming!  A part of the West TN STEM Hub, these robots are perfect for student teachers and local educators who want to enhance their science, technology, engineering, and math lessons with a fun hands-on activity. 

 

Know Where to Go to Get Going

The University Libraries are here to help you at every step of your relationship with the University of Memphis. One of the best resources we provide are Research Guides designed to offer insight into resources that could be useful to you in your chosen field of study. However, you might need something a little more general to help you move forward. 

That’s why the Libraries have created Orientation Research Guides. Whether you are new to the University as an undergraduate student, are continuing your studies in Graduate School, we have an orientation guide for you. We *also* have guides for students who are studying abroad or study online. 

These guides will fill you in on the library services and resources that will be the most beneficial for where you are at, whether that is your first research paper, or you are preparing to teach your first class, or you are studying in Costa Rica or your hometown in Wisconsin. 

Check them out:

Kanopy Movie Review: Throne of Blood

Throne of Blood logoFog rolls across a desolate landscape. A chanting song gives an ominous command to the viewer: “Look upon the ruins / Of the castle of delusion.” Thus begins Akira Kurosawa’s 1957 film ‘Throne of Blood,’ a retelling of William Shakespeare’s infamous play ‘Macbeth’ set in feudal Japan. Kurosawa, considered a master of Japanese cinema and samurai films, provides a haunting portrait of ambition and the corruption of power. So, if you like murder and betrayal, prophecy and the descent into madness, this is one you should check out.

The film begins well enough for our main character, samurai commander Taketoki Washizu. After winning a major battle for his lord, Washizu and his friend Miki ride through the mazelike and appropriately named Spider’s Web Forest. Here, they run into a prophetic spirit, who tells them of future events that seem to be good tidings of the future. However, as each of these predictions come true, things begin to unravel for Washizu and all those around him. He indeed rises to be the leader of Spider’s Web Castle, as the spirit foretold, but at what cost to his own sanity? By his side during this ascent is his wife Asaji, who provides subtle but effective nudges to encourage Washizu to perform the horrific tasks necessary to both capture and maintain the power he craves. Without spoiling too much, things spiral out of control for our main character, culminating in a shocking final scene that sticks with you well after the film ends.

One of my favorite aspects of ‘Throne of Blood’ is the atmosphere created by Kurosawa. This is certainly one case where watching a film in black and white heightens the experience. It looks gorgeous and adds to a pervasive mood of dread. Many of the scenes also take place in fog or at night, adding to the confusion and isolation that Washizu experiences during the deterioration of his psyche. Spider’s Web Castle itself, the supposed ultimate prize, is foreboding and unwelcoming in appearance. It is also refreshing that the action sequences only serve to compliment the character study of Washizu instead of the other way around.

This was my first viewing of ‘Throne of Blood,’ and I have to say it has aged well. It is a great watch that builds tension until the very end. If you want to see it for yourself, the film is available through the University of Memphis Libraries’ database, Kanopy. A quick note on Kanopy itself: it is a wonderful service if you are a movie buff of any kind. It gets a wide variety of newer releases (check out the offerings from the outstanding A24 studio!) while also allowing the user to explore the history of cinema. I encourage you to take advantage of it for your next movie night!

Seeking great speakers for NEDtalks!

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NEDtalks is a bi-annual research forum hosted by the Ned McWherter Library. 

We are looking for UofM professors (faculty, instructors) of any discipline to present short, engaging, entertaining 15-minute presentations in the TEDtalks style. Past speakers have engaged topics both diverse and fascinating, including presentations on blackface in opera, the scholarly path of a research chemist, whiteness in the Bible, feminist strategies used by “booby streamers” in the online gaming world, and supermassive black holes. We’d love to know what makes you excited about what you are researching, and to carry your audience into that thrill.

Get more information at the libraries’ NEDtalks website. Got a great proposal? Submit by Friday, October 18

NEDtalks will take place Wednesday, November 13, and Thursday, November 14, 2019, 3-5 PM in the 2nd Floor Commons Area.

Footnotes from the Grid Iron

Written by Shelia Gaines, Circulation Coordinator:

Friday night lights. Season Openers. Homecoming. Saturday tailgating. Yes. You guessed it. It’s football season. That time of the year when team loyalties test family ties and some spouses suffer through their annual season as living “sports widows”. 

If you are wondering this year (and every year) what all the fuss is about, why not visit The Ned and check out the literary side of the game?  If you need to start from scratch, Football: The First 100 Years: The Untold Story may be the perfect book for you. But, be warned that football on the other side of the pond is a little different than the grid iron.

If you are a more seasoned sports fan and think you would enjoy the players’ stories that have been told on the big screen, we have something for you, too. Did you know that former NFL Tackle, Michael Oher, began his road to fame at our regional rival, Ole Miss? If not you can read all about it in The Blind Side by Michael Lewis. Better yet, read the story in his own words in How I Beat the Odds: From Homelessness, to the Blind Side, and Beyond. Find out how he felt when he went to see the movie incognito and saw the fan’s reaction. If your loyalties divide anytime you don’t see a Memphis connection, don’t forget that Michael Oher’s adoptive father was a broadcaster for the Memphis Grizzlies for many years. 

Find these and other sports-related tomes in the library. Take some time to peruse the stacks or find an interesting article or research idea from one of our databases. But, be sure you take care of all of your library business during the weekdays, because you may have better things to do with your weekends.

September Events @ McWherter Library

We have some great events at McWherter Library for you in September! Visit our calendar for more details and to register for events!

Welcome Carnival: Aug. 26 & 27

Stop by McWherter Library’s Welcome Carnival on Monday, August 26th, 11 am – 2 pm, and Tuesday, August 27th, 1 pm – 4 pm! Learn more about what each department in the Libraries can do just for you. Stop by each table, receive a ticket and information, then redeem your tickets at the Prize Table for snacks & prizes! See you there!

Textbooks for Tiger Veterans at McWherter Library

Photograph
Rachel, the interim coordinator of technical services, processing Textbooks for Tiger Veterans! (Image: Trey Clark/UofM)

The University Libraries is collaborating with Veteran and Military Student Services (VMSS) to house and circulate textbooks for Tiger Veterans. The collection is housed in the Reserves shelving, behind McWherter Library’s Check Out Desk, so that the collection will be reserved just for VMSS students. The Libraries’ Cataloging and Collection Management departments worked hard to process the books in time for the start of fall semester!

View the collection in the Libraries’ catalog. Each book can be checked out for 1 semester to students who are affiliated with the military.

 

In Libraries We Crust

In Libraries We Crust!

If you have questions about the University Libraries, we have answers! Find out what the Libraries can do for you (did someone say free 3D printing? GoPro cameras for check-out? Wii and XBox? Research help? eBooks? Group study rooms? Quiet study space? Oh yeah they did!) while you enjoy a slice of pizza next Wednesday from 12:00 – 2:00 in the Rotunda of the McWherter Library.